Bigger isn’t always better

By Michael Scruse
Published September 17th, 2021
Is bigger better? Not always, and here is why!
Bigger isn’t always better

If I had a dollar for every time someone said to me “can you make the logo” bigger I’d be rich! Well maybe not rich, but it is one of the most comment bits of feedback we get.

Now I hear you say, “if it’s common feedback why not just do it”? Well that is a good point, but it really is a case that bigger isn’t always better, and here’s why…

It takes up more space

This one is simple physics - something that is bigger will take up more space. While in some instances this is OK (on a billboard for example) on a website - especially when viewed on a mobile phone -  space is at a premium, and to be honest there are more important things that should be given the priority: such as content, navigation and a call to action.

Have a look at the image below. This is a screenshot of a real website I came across recently while browsing on my mobile.

I’ve edited it to hide the identity of the business, but you can see there are 3 main sections. The first is a banner along the top with a text notice. The second block is the logo, menu and cart buttons are - as you can see it’s large, especially for a mobile.

This leaves just 50% of the screen for them to show their products, but what is worse the notice and logo sections remain fixed when you scroll down, so there is never going to be any extra room for content.

Now this isn’t just a case of the logo being too big, which it is, but also poor development (and testing). Without trying too hard I’d be able to recover the entire logo section in space for content and still have the logo, menu and cart visible and accessible.

Good custom web design and development can help avoid issues like this.

Your customers aren’t here to see your logo

The goal of every website is to get people to visit. When you get those visitors what is it that you want them to do? For many sites it’s about selling something - be that a product or a service. 

With that in mind when someone lands on your website, what is more important - that they sit there and admire your beautiful logo, or that they can instantly see what it is that you do and how you can help them?

Don’t get me wrong - a logo is important (very important), as are the colours, fonts and images that are used on your website, but they are all supporting acts for your content. Your branding elements bring everything together, they visually tell people who you are, provide a nice environment for your content and build familiarity.

The subtlety of design

This one is a bit wanky, but good design is subtle, and it ensures that everything works in harmony and is balanced. Look at some of the big brands - the likes of Apple, Nike, McDonalds - the logo on their websites are discrete and allow for their imagery, content and products to take center stage, yet because everything works together you know instantly who they are.

Working through a proven web design process will ensure that all elements of your website are balanced and give your visitors the best possible experience.

So when you’re looking to next embark on a website redesign give some thought to who your audience is and work with expert web designers who can give you the benefit of their web design and development expertise.

Michael Scruse
Michael Scruse

Michael brings his technical, web and sales expertise to every project, backed by almost 30 years’ experience in the IT industry.

In 2018, Michael became one of Australia’s first Certified Joomla Administrators.

Michael is also a qualified chef, although cooking is now in a domestic kitchen. Michael is a bit of a history buff and is currently researching his own family history.